Tuesday, November 7, 2017

JP Morgan Sunk the Titanic to Form Federal Reserve, Undeniable Proof


(Daniel NewtonShocking new evidence has emerged that JP Morgan carefully orchestrated the sinking of the Titanic so that he could form the Federal Reserve.



Related: Edgar Cayce's Health and Life Readings for Nikola Tesla - “The present is theirs; the future, for which I really worked, is mine.”

Source - Operation Disclosure 

by Daniel Newton, November 6th, 2017

Back in 1889, a book was written by Morgan Robertson, spookily titled “Wreck of the Titan”, detailed the demise of a luxury liner that hit an iceberg killing everyone on board.

The book became eerily prophetic as the disaster would play out almost to the exact detail of the book.


What was different with the Titanic was the huge political implications it would have after it sunk.

Some of the wealthiest key figures in the financial industry died when the Titanic sunk, all of them had one thing in common; they opposed the Federal Reserve.


The book became eerily prophetic as the disaster would play out almost to the exact detail of the book.

Let's get to the facts:

FACT: JP Morgan funded/built the Titanic

FACT: JP Morgan was booked on the voyage but canceled at the last second.

FACT: Friend of JP Morgan, Milton Hersey, also canceled at the last moment. (and survived to build the Hersey food empire)


What was different with the Titanic was the huge political implications it would have after it sunk.



FACT: There were no red flares on board to signal to any boats for rescue. Only white flares that signal a party and that everything is okay.

FACT: It was the first ship of its kind with the ability to seal decks electromagnetically which could also seal people below deck.

FACT: The Captain Edward Smith was one of the most decorated Captains of his time and would have been totally out of character by avoiding precautions.

FACT: The author of the book was poisoned to death a couple years after the Titanic sank.

FACT: The Federal Reserve was formed the very next year.

FACT: The Astor Family was one of the richest families in the world and John Astor III opposed the Federal Reserve.

John Jacob Astor IV, the richest man in the world at the time, a friend of Nikola Tesla, and an outspoken opponent of the creation of the Federal Reserve.

Astor gained his wealth, in part, as a real estate builder, investor, and inventor.

Other prominent Federal Reserve detractors, such as Benjamin Guggenheim and Isa Strauss, also died on board.

DID JP MORGAN GET THE IDEA OF HOW TO KILL OFF THE OPPOSITION TO THE FEDERAL RESERVE FROM A BOOK WRITTEN 14 YEARS PRIOR?

This was a book titled “The Titan” published 14 years before the Titanic sank and look at the similarities.

Did they hatch a plan at Jekyll Island to build a ship to eliminate the competition?

Similarities to the Titanic -

Although the novel was written before the Olympic-class Titanic had even been designed, there are some remarkable similarities between the fictional and real-life counterparts.

Like the Titanic, the fictional ship sank in April in the North Atlantic, and there were not enough lifeboats for the passengers.

There are also similarities between the size (800 ft long for Titan versus 882 ft 9 in long for the Titanic), speed (25 knots for Titan, 21 knots for Titanic) and life-saving equipment.

Beyond the name, the similarities between the Titanic and the fictional Titan include: Described as “unsinkable”

The Titanic was the world’s largest luxury liner (882 feet, displacing 63,000 long tons), and was once described as being practically “unsinkable”.

The Titan was the largest craft afloat and the greatest of the works of men (800 feet, displacing 75,000 tons), and was considered “unsinkable”.

Shortage of lifeboats -

The Titanic carried only 16 lifeboats, plus 4 Engelhardt folding lifeboats, less than half the number required for her passenger capacity of 3000.

The Titan carried “as few as the law allowed”, 24 lifeboats, less than half needed for her 3000 capacity.

Struck an iceberg -

Moving too fast at 22½ knots, the Titanic struck an iceberg on the starboard side on the night of April 14, 1912 in the North Atlantic 400 miles away from Newfoundland.

Also on an April night, in the North Atlantic 400 miles from Newfoundland (Terranova), the Titan hit an iceberg while traveling at 25 knots, also on the starboard side.


Sinking -

The unsinkable Titanic sank, and more than half of her 2200 passengers died.

The indestructible Titan also sank, more than half of her 2500 passengers drowning.

Went down bow first, the Titan actually capsizing before it sank.

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